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TheReturnOfTheKing
Jurassic Park Treasury
SupcommMonroee
WikiBuilder1147
Mr.Robbo
Pschycron
• 4/6/2014

Great Rampager

The great rampager, scientifically known as Bipestank rex, is a large predatory animal living in the north-east portions of the Jaklean supercontinent, located on the planet Glaucus. It is 49 feet long in the largest verified specimens, and over 23 feet tall, but is usually around 36 feet long and 16 feet tall. It has three limbs, two of which are legs, and a single arm coming out of the chest to use as a balance. It also has a long tail as a balance, and a large skull with jaws filled with sharp teeth, with a beak-like structure at the end of the snout. They have analogues of whiskers located on the sides of their heads, meant to sense where the wind is blowing to avoid being detected by prey. They have two nostrils and four eyes as well. They can smell blood from several miles away and see cleary at distances of up to 500 feet. However, they do have one weakness. They have one weakness though. Their spinal cords are rather fragile for their size, so if it trips over, it will often get killed by a broken spine. Great rampagers are not sapient.

Yeah, you can pretty much guess what creature I based this off. The Latin name means "bipedal tank".

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TheReturnOfTheKing
Jurassic Park Treasury
SupcommMonroee
WikiBuilder1147
Mr.Robbo
Pschycron
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• 4/6/2014

Not neccissarily, content in general is posted on these boards. It would be best if a planet of origin was provided but there's no reason it can't be done otherwise.

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• 4/6/2014

Novel. We just need to make sure the pitch is fleshed out some more, in order to give us a better idea of what the user is planning. Planet of origin would be useful (especially the environment), as well as, perhaps, more insight into the evolution of the Great Rampager. Link

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• 4/7/2014

The planet of origin is Glaucus, a planet containing one supercontinent with lots of tiny islands branching off it, and vast, deep oceans. The habitat of the Great Rampager is rather sub-tropical, with many plains and deltas, with a few gallery forests, sort of like Africa.

The Great Rampager as we know it today evolved around 500,000 years ago, and is part of a family of three-limbed carnivores called bipestankids, which are the planet's dominant land predators.

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• 4/7/2014

Planning any sort of civilization or political entity governing the area, or maybe some other race? If not, exposure would be troublesome of the race was entirely standalone. There are ways around that, however. Concerns aside, fascinating concept.

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• 4/7/2014
Agreed. Good job :D
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• 4/7/2014
SupcommMonroee wrote:
Planning any sort of civilization or political entity governing the area, or maybe some other race? If not, exposure would be troublesome of the race was entirely standalone. There are ways around that, however. Concerns aside, fascinating concept.


I might plan a sapient race for the area. I need to think what the race would be like though.

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A FANDOM User
• 4/7/2014

I, for one, think creating a world without sapient life could be an interesting thought experiment, one I should probably attempt in my free time. Don't discourage him from doing so.

Love the idea. if I were an Admin, I'd give you a thumb's up.

- King, forgot to log in. Also, hello again, JPT! Jurassic Park Wiki, remember?

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• 4/7/2014

I'm not discouraging him, I'm just letting him know that a creation like that, no matter how fascinating, would end up not being as much of a "front line" creation as the sapient races and their nations and political machinations.

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• 4/8/2014
142.22.16.55 wrote:
I, for one, think creating a world without sapient life could be an interesting thought experiment, one I should probably attempt in my free time. Don't discourage him from doing so.

Love the idea. if I were an Admin, I'd give you a thumb's up.

- King, forgot to log in. Also, hello again, JPT! Jurassic Park Wiki, remember?

Yes, I remember.

And a planet without sapient life would indeed be interesting. I am currently thinking of mangrove niches on Glaucus being taken over by sexually dimorphic cephalopod-like organisms. The females are mostly sessile and are rooted to the ground by their tentacles, but the males are insect-like vicious predators that defend the females in exhange for mating. The males start their lives as miniature versions of themselves, but females start their lives as fish-like creatures that eat as much algae as they can until they use the chloroplasts from their food, much like this sea slug.

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• 4/8/2014

OK, THIS I WANT TO READ!! :D

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